A Love Note for Yellowknife by Kim Fahner

.                                                after Terry Pamplin   Wild car rides, these roads swinging around corners that surprise, climbing up laneways that press themselves into being, imprints on  hills, on … [click for more]

Blankets by Félix Ruiz de la Orden

and yet I feel for the music in the distance moving towards the motionless us conspicuously caught dynamic digits climbing and descending time tricks reset the tape four to the B bee to the flower waiting for it assured nourishment this one goes up tones sing direct to entrances disguised … [click for more]

ASK A SHORTLISTER: What are you reading?

We asked the poets shortlisted for our 2019 Book Awards some questions about their writing lives, inspirations and -of course – poetry. Join us for our weekly series Ask a Shortlister until the winners are announced on June 8, 2019. *** What are you reading?   Tanis Franco: Obabakoak by Bernardo Atxaga; Days by Moonlight by André … [click for more]

mend in the balsam by Mackenzie Ground

tourists visit our camp mark our noted authenticity note our marked authenticity lacking there never hunted môswa just books with prose statements that shatter me this existence the struggle of guilt never feel political enough never feel anonymous enough never .           establish .        … [click for more]

Excerpt from how it is by Mercedes Eng

  Copyright © Mercedes Eng. Originally published in The Capilano Review (3.35, Spring 2018).   – Mercedes Eng teaches and writes in Vancouver, the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh peoples. She is the author of Mercenary English (CUE, 2013 & Talonbooks, 2018) and Prison Industrial Complex Explodes (Talonbooks, … [click for more]

Chinatown by Leanne Dunic

First, there were them, and them, and them. Then more. Faces mixed. Sepia, camel, chestnut, and caramel. A pocket here, a clan there. Whole communities disappeared.     And now there is me. I will draw you some maps.                   Birthmarks: some … [click for more]

Brine by Mallory Amirault

Feeling bad for ourselves is a coin operated hobby.         The bank is a 45 minute drive from the home.                                                       … [click for more]

ASK A SHORTLISTER: Writing practice

We asked the poets shortlisted for our 2019 Book Awards some questions about their writing lives, inspirations and -of course – poetry. Join us for our weekly series Ask a Shortlister until the winners are announced on June 8, 2019. *** Do you feel that you’ve found a writing practice that works for you? … [click for more]

Resurgence by Ashley Hynd

the sequence of events is unclear still somewhere between the taste of limes and shit I almost understood history—in the dream .                        I am chasing manidoo-waabooz .                        he … [click for more]

Eye Tattoo by John Creary

She got a smoking deal .           on an eye tattoo by an unlicensed artist .           and now it’s buttered with puss, horribly infected. .           She can barely open her eyes, leans blindly into remorse, .        … [click for more]

Husbandry by Nancy Lee

Dogs in the gully are slow to rot. Their corpses rigor, insects ripple fur, my hands part a veil of flies. Mongrels are no match for the gardener’s light touch on his rifle. His devotion to our hens slickens my heart, itches in the back of my neck. A boy … [click for more]

in descent by Daniel G. Scott

there are days  meant for descent   but as i go down  there is an ocean in the basement   it laps against the furnace pulses in and out of the storage room, tidal   flotsam of memory bumps against the tool rack and wall   outside is dry but the bottom of my life is … [click for more]

ASK A SHORTLISTER: Writing lessons

We asked the poets shortlisted for our 2019 Book Awards some questions about their writing lives, inspirations and -of course – poetry. Join us for our weekly series Ask a Shortlister until the winners are announced on June 8, 2019. ***   What lesson that you learned through a creative writing course/workshop/lecture sticks with … [click for more]

Last Words by Katherine Pilon

  Copyright © Katherine Pilon. Honourable mention in the 2019 National Broadsheet Contest from the League of Canadian Poets.   – Katherine Pilon is a student at York University, studying in both the English and Creative Writing programs. Currently residing in Ontario, Canada, Katherine likes to drink coffee so she can … [click for more]

The Encyclopedia by Christine Smart

When I was a child, I read the science encyclopedia to find my origins. The fetus floating in a bubble, didn’t look like me, nor did the fin-tailed fish called spermatozoa. Watery, translucent, amoeboid, slick as albumin; ovum, sperm, fallopian sounding like flowers or foreign fruits I couldn’t grasp in … [click for more]

Ratatoskr by Alice Major

Ratatoskr, squirrel, scurries up and down the ash tree, his world-axis, Yggdrasil, heaven-wheel, winding spindle, one tree that transects the cosmos. His scold-chatter carries gossip and earthworm insults up to the raven that alights, folds wings like a wet umbrella, black at the topmost branch. This ash tree in my … [click for more]

it grows on trees by Rita Bouvier

the old Manitoba maple is a flutter of birds chirping, growing wings. a friend. it doesn’t talk much, just nods waiting for the next word to fall out of your mind and onto the page. it spreads its arms wide, reaching out in shimmers of green and silver, and long-lost … [click for more]

Rainforest by Barbara Black

. . . Nictitating eyelid sky omening leaf mould melancholia mollusc ruminating spores/ spruce pores sweat steamed [fungus]/ frog needles old man’s beard <musk> devil’s club seeps gloom.   Copyright © Barbara Black. Originally published in Heartwood: Poems for the Love of Trees (League of Canadian Poets, 2018).   – Barbara … [click for more]

#NPM19: Weekly Round-Up | WEEK FOUR

Overwhelmed by all the amazing National Poetry Month content coming out every day? Need a refresher? We’ll be rounding up our blog content, along with the awesome stuff our friends at Read Local BC, Open Book, All Lit Up, and CBC Books are releasing – plus other NPM news that catches our eye each week; all month … [click for more]

#NPM19: Canadian Independent Bookstore Day

In honour of Canadian Independent Bookstore Day – a day to support the amazing independent bookstores in our communities that help maintain a thriving book industry across the country – we’re sharing a selection of photos sent to us by indie bookstores all around Canada of National Poetry Month displays! … [click for more]

You may have heard by Joanne Epp

If your home is near a park, you’ll live longer. If there’s a plant in your hospital room, you’ll need fewer Tylenol 3s. If you walk in a forest, you will sleep more deeply. If you watch ducks float downriver under trailing willow branches, your distance vision will improve. If … [click for more]

ASK A SHORTLISTER: Literary Icons

We asked the poets shortlisted for our 2019 Book Awards some questions about their writing lives, inspirations and –of course– poetry. Join us for our weekly series Ask a Shortlister until the winners are announced on June 8, 2019. ***   Have you had the chance to meet your literary icon(s)? What was that … [click for more]

Being tree by Daniel G. Scott

imagine a whole life being in one place— centuries. roots press down grip soil, that soil, this earth, coil around rocks reach for moisture and wait.   no, not wait trees have no measured time but light with one kind of breathing and night with another breath, giving back. not … [click for more]

#NPM19: Guest Post | By Fenn Stewart

As many Indigenous leaders and writers have pointed out, the colonial falsehood that Canada was initially, or is essentially, a place of “wilderness” (in other words, empty of people) “underl[ies] a lot of the issues going on today, specifically aboriginal title and rights, land claims, the land question.”[1] This falsehood … [click for more]

Smoke bush by Veronica Gaylie

Instead of a tower above the town be a Smoke Bush. Be the treee that absorbs all. Know you are called to a higher purpose beyond your purple smoky leaves. Grow wild, wrap around rocks. Change the invisible air around you simply by being. Provide a place for birds to … [click for more]

2019 Book Awards: Shortlists Announcement

The League of Canadian Poets is proud to present the 2019 Book Awards Shortlists, including the Gerald Lampert Memorial Award, the Pat Lowther Memorial Award, and the Raymond Souster Award. The winners – who will each receive $2000 thanks to funding from Canada Council for the Arts , Ontario Arts Council, Toronto Arts Council, and Canada … [click for more]

Shelterbelt by Brenda Sciberras

Amidst morning birdsong to capture all the light of day In spring, when sun thawed the ground we plant thousands of seedlings Ordered when snow sat on soil from Indian Head, Saskatchewan We map our Manitoba shelterbelt imagine the sun reflecting its array of colour Maple & Colorado Blue Spruce, … [click for more]

Blue ice, Lake Wonish, 1935 by Greg Santos

after the painting by Canadian painter Anne Savage (1896-1971)   The fog has befuddled this February day. Silent save my footsteps, bird laughter, wind. Turning to peek at our family cottage it is all but dwarfed by trees and new snow. Today all looks blue and peculiar. Jack Frost, a … [click for more]

#NPM19: Weekly Round-Up | WEEK THREE

Overwhelmed by all the amazing National Poetry Month content coming out every day? Need a refresher? We’ll be rounding up our blog content, along with the awesome stuff our friends at Read Local BC, Open Book, All Lit Up, 49th Shelf, and CBC Books are releasing – plus other NPM news that catches our eye each week; all … [click for more]

A frost crusted poplar by David Yerex Williamson

Following the erosion of cracked imagery on crooked page I snowshoed to the mouth of the river past the crisp site the fox patrols past the comfort of language past the abandoned trading post no words bouncing sounds through sites of empty names still air through tamarack blank drifts between … [click for more]

Sisters by Kate Marshall Flaherty

shush like nurses leaf-breeze shimmering, undersides silver-green. I feel your gnarled roots fingering deep into earth, as grounded as I wish to be.   .                Sisters, you who tickle .                heaven with slender tips, .      … [click for more]

Populus tremuloides by Al Rempel

where forest meets meadow there’s a stand of thin trembling aspen like a dowel shop squeezed between city businesses on the one hundred block and run by a mustached man who whispers to himself on and off at the cash register and sometimes leans out over the sidewalk and says … [click for more]

BIPOC Writers Connect: Mentorship, Networking, Training

We’re excited to be partnering with The Writers’ Union of Canada and the Ontario Arts Council to present BIPOC Writers Connect: Mentorship, Networking, Training, a half-day conference for Black, Indigenous, and racialized emerging writers on October 30, 2019. This conference is a chance to connect with industry professionals, funding officers, … [click for more]

#NPM19: Fresh Voices 16

Welcome to the sixteenth edition of Fresh Voices, a project from and for the League’s associate members. The League’s associate members are talented poets who are writing and publishing poetry on their way to becoming established professional poets in the Canadian literary community. We are excited to be taking this opportunity … [click for more]

Survival by Joan Conway

(For Noreen) the first cabin she built in the clearing where a cottonwood grew. chain sawed the trunk below earth’s level, covered it with soil and poured cement years later the floor cracked, out popped a small seedling she watered it, watched its courageous search for light. it did not … [click for more]

#NPM19: Weekly Round-Up | WEEK TWO

Overwhelmed by all the amazing National Poetry Month content coming out every day? Need a refresher? We’ll be rounding up our blog content, along with the awesome stuff our friends at Read Local BC, Open Book, All Lit Up, 49th Shelf, and CBC Books are releasing – plus other NPM news that catches our eye each week; … [click for more]

Next lifetime by Magie Dominic

In my next lifetime I will be a tree;  someone else can be the birds. I will be a branch holding birds,  an abundance of them; the tree old people lean against when they need to stop all their walking, where lovers carve words on a summer evening when they … [click for more]

Tree by Luciano Iacobelli

to me they were just tall blanks remote giants impassive as Nature itself I could never understand the big deal why so many fairy tales and art about so much leaf and bark but it was love that first made me really look at trees I’d come home from school … [click for more]

Review: Little Red | By Kerry Gilbert

Mother Tongue Publishing | 2019 | $19.95 | Purchase online Reviewed by Bill Arnott   Grey. That was the day. Like most November days in Vernon, BC. Bundling against cold, I made my way from Sveva Caetani’s pleasantly haunted mansion across a downtown where I lived, worked, and grew up … [click for more]

Late October woods by Glen Sorestad

I love autumn aspen woods – the clinging pungence .                                      of fallen leaves, a sudden sense of antiquity gathering in the nostrils like musty cellar memories, a constant reminder .      … [click for more]

#NPM19: The Griffin Poetry Prize Shortlist Announcement

  The reveal of the Griffin Poetry Prize shortlist is a significant date on the calendars of all those interested in Canadian poetry; it is the world’s largest prize for a first edition single collection of poetry written in English. Candidates are shortlisted in two categories: Canadian and International. The shortlist was released today, April … [click for more]

Decision tree by Monica Kidd

Take the candle to the woods. Place it at the foot of the tree bent ninety degrees by some previous insult and sheer bloody-mindedness. Hang the towel on the fence. Undress, never mind the westerly. Clouds are over the moon and there is all the time in the world. Open … [click for more]

Marks by Brian Henderson

Within a steep or stretched charm Slight variation circulates Going underground at the sigil Of the future aspen colonies That can be thousands of years old Though human-spanned trees but Not quite so fast the end all of each singularity Burst catkin departure Of a loved one as if Clouds … [click for more]

The banyan tree by Cheryl Antao-Xavier

Four generations nestled in arms like sturdy pillars. Nature’s hand had soared wildly creating a mammoth masterpiece. A powerful patriarch, the giant banyan tree. One by one its siblings fell to make way for urban sprawl. The banyan tree was the last to go, defiant spectre to the end. They … [click for more]

#NPM19: Weekly Round-Up | WEEK ONE

  Overwhelmed by all the amazing National Poetry Month content coming out every day? Need a refresher? We’ll be rounding up our blog content, along with the awesome stuff our friends at Open Book, All Lit Up, 49th Shelf, and CBC Books are releasing – plus other NPM news that catches our eye each week; all month … [click for more]

Wind in Killarney Provincial Park by Roger Nash

There’s no bird-song in the forest at noon, only the whisper of leaves in the wind. It’s like hearing a huge crowd shouting, far off, indistinctly, that something is happening, but no victors or vanquished, and we’re all in some “this” together. Standing still, the murmur of light and shade … [click for more]

three haiku by Nane Couzier

éclaircie soudaine l’érable creux affalé sur les épinettes ❦ album de famille les deux mêmes marronniers depuis 1900 ❦ grand pin maritime sa silhouette tortueuse incrustée en moi   Copyright © Nane Couzier. Originally published in Heartwood: Poems for the Love of Trees (League of Canadian Poets, 2018).   – Née … [click for more]

#NPM19: What does poetry mean to you?

April is our favourite time of year because everyone is talking about poetry! We are incredibly proud of and humbled by the role we play in supporting and amplifying the voices of Canada’s incredible poets and their contributions to the Canadian – and global – poetry community. Poetry does so … [click for more]

#NPM19: 10 Ways to Support your Favourite Poets

At the League, we work hard to support poets by administering programs and funds for governments and private donors and encouraging an appreciative readership and audience for poetry through educational partnerships and presentations to diverse groups. As the recognized voice of Canadian poets, we represent their concerns to governments, publishers, and the … [click for more]

PIYP Day 2019: Sarah Yi-Mei Tsiang

  Visit by Sarah Yi-Mei Tsiang   I saw my father yesterday, sitting on the wall of his mausoleum. He held my hand and told me he forgave me and I asked, for what?   He smelled of apples, an autumn of leaves for skin. I remember you like this, I … [click for more]

PIYP Day 2019: Eleonore Schönmaier

  “it didn’t happen here” by Eleonore Schönmaier   i‘m in the bus which is really just an old car  and it‘s night and pouring rain and i‘m thirteen and the car is jammed with bodies and we‘re about to head down the long dirt road out to my settlement and the driver shouts, don’t let the drunk indian in, shouts to close  the door and i slam the door shut and blood runs down the  window and … [click for more]

PIYP Day 2019: Harry Posner

  Still be still be still be by Harry Posner   Still be still be still be Calm or calm or calm or Pla cid oh pla cid oh pla cid oh Re lax re lax re lax re Ding for pleasure Ding for dinner Ring for treasure The pleasure of your Company your tympani Your thrum drum not … [click for more]

PIYP Day 2019: Charlie Petch

  Glom Glom Sunraises by Charlie Petch   Dawn was especially noisy today, as the three suns sprouted from horizon, as the lamprey loons sung whale songs, as your tentacle slipped from my gilled side.   I opened one eyeball, to see the shine of us. Watched feathered spider flies steal the … [click for more]

PIYP Day 2019: Jim Nason

  Eggshells  by Jim Nason   When Rooster flew the Co-op to explore the world on stilts, no one talked  about the state of the nest he abandoned, the deathly  smell of broken, featherless hens, the eggshells  of prisoner grief that littered the floor-sod, rat pee  and half eaten worms, the … [click for more]

PIYP Day 2019: kjmunro

  A haiku by kjmunro   low winter sun the mist from a mandarin   Winner of the 2019 Very Small Verse contest from the League of Canadian Poets Download the League’s 2019 Poem in Your Pocket Day Booklet here. Download this poem as a postcard, designed by Megan Fildes, here. … [click for more]

PIYP Day 2019: Lorie Miseck

  Jazz (A Variation) by Lorie Miseck   A minor key swings open the blue door  of the heart.  Brassed and unhinged sound unwinds.  Sunset slides  down the day’s spine.  Slides down to the hour of smoke and wine, to artless sway of belonging.   To the one, to the lonely, to the only to each of … [click for more]

PIYP Day 2019: Kathryn Mockler

  Water by Kathryn Mockler   If you are feeling hopeless, then give up hope. I won’t tell anyone. I won’t tell you to put on a brave face or feel better about yourself. I won’t tell you to wash your hair or pick up the dirty clothes. You don’t … [click for more]

PIYP Day 2019: Allison LaSorda

  Beekeeping by Allison LaSorda   Download the League’s 2019 Poem in Your Pocket Day Booklet here. Download this poem as a postcard, designed by Megan Fildes, here. Share this poem on social media with the hashtag #PocketPoem.   – Allison LaSorda‘s work has appeared in The Fiddlehead, North American Review, Shenandoah, and Hazlitt, and she was … [click for more]

PIYP Day 2019: Fiona Tinwei Lam

  Ode to Chopsticks by Fiona Tinwei Lam   Grandfather sets the bowl full of marbles before me. I pick up the chopsticks and hover,  then picture my hand as a heron  with a long, long beak plunging down  to pluck each orb, lift it  through air and held breath in a tremulous trip toward the saucer.     Five thousand years of evolution in hand:  branches … [click for more]

PIYP Day 2019: Adebe DeRango-Adem

  O Sea of Troubles We Did Not Take Arms Against by Adebe DeRango-Adem   for many moons we were complete                          like a single river how beautiful we drifted                    … [click for more]

PIYP Day 2019: Lorne Daniel

  Crushed by Lorne Daniel   The bad news this week relentless, rolling past my glazed face. Addictions, elections, deaths of the wrong  people, hypnotic grief. Dazed  at the roadside today I breathe hot exhaust. Blurred  tires hiss, rut and groove the grey just a step away. Over, over. On the shoulder, waiting … [click for more]

PIYP Day 2019: Heather Cadsby

  Quick Question by Heather Cadsby   Speaking of good parenting I asked her how to be a natural mother. Or she asked me. It was blowing up a storm and we all knew a south wind brings rain. At least in that area. You couldn’t drink the lake water. … [click for more]

PIYP Day 2019: Marilyn Bowering

  Brother    by Marilyn Bowering   While he studies the stars outdoors, model airplanes spin on fine webs in his room. Already he is lifting into the air, wings on his heels, a small Hermes signaling to the Great Bear.  He reaches the outermost planets, he passes the edges of travel, … [click for more]

PIYP Day 2019: Yvonne Blomer

  Spotted Owl as Desire  by Yvonne Blomer .               After Robert Bateman’s Mossy Branches, Spotted Owl    True owl. Old-growth owl. Nocturnal owl. The clock turns by you.  Barking owl. Whistling.  Hooted notes fall from mossed trees.  Old-man moss. Knight’s Plume moss. Creeping-  feather moss. Nothing … [click for more]

#NPM19: Place by Gwen Benaway

  1.   I want to start here.   “no language is neutral seared into the spine’s unraveling. here is history too.”   Dionne Brand, No Language is Neutral   2.   I can’t write an essay on the political implications of Canadian nature poetry. I don’t believe in Canada, … [click for more]

Tree of Heaven by Bänoo Zan

Why do I worry about heaven? Have I lost my way to earth? . Tree of heaven is on earth going through fall . stripping out of her leaves with no innuendo . her sap unable to stop the loss (After Babel we are not of the same mind— . … [click for more]

The Sainte-Adèle variations by rob mclennan

. . . Every second-floor movement broadcast, hewn logs to the fore. I thought this was typical. Rhetoric, beats. Out of bed, on two strong legs. A Thanksgiving or two. This long, summer island. The Laurentides. What kinds of details required: such accurate flowers, a deer. Exaggerated silence. We ignore … [click for more]

2019 Book Awards: Longlist Announcement

To launch National Poetry Month, we are thrilled to announce the 2019 Book Awards longlists for the Gerald Lampert and Pat Lowther Memorial Awards, and the Raymond Souster Award. Shortlists for our Book Awards will be announced Tuesday, April 23 – we can’t wait! Congratulations to all of the longlisted poets and their publishers!   2019 … [click for more]

When I Reach by Eleonore Schönmaier

the tunnel exit you’ll be there waiting for me sitting on a wooden  crate at the side   of the tracks you’ll be holding a bowl of  pumpkin soup you cooked on a camp   stove by the dust  blown side of the journey. my hands and face will be dirty and … [click for more]

Woolly Bear By Tammy Armstrong

This fall everyone looked to the bands on a woolly bear caterpillar, and predicated as usual the direst of dire winters.  .                                                   – Annie Dillard   … [click for more]

Resurrections by Myna Wallin

My mother is alive again  in my dreams. And so is my father, though they rarely appear together.   In one variation my mother returns to visit, her cancer healed. We talk for a bit & she whispers Don’t tell your father I was here.   I ask her why she doesn’t … [click for more]

A haiku by Jacquie Pearce

. . . . lingering grief… a trace of Fukushima in the salmon   Copyright © Jacquie Pearce. Winner of the 2018 National Haiku Contest from the League of Canadian Poets.   – Jacquie Pearce grew up on Vancouver Island. She has published poetry, short non-fiction and several novels for children. Her … [click for more]

Convergence by Fern G. Z. Carr

The intersection   of a pane of sun and cloud    with a faint clink of hollow bones.   Bewildered black eyes.    Beak tipped with a droplet of scarlet.   Rattled.   Numbed.    A grounding paralysis    felling feathers    that once graced azure skies,   a grounding paralysis   and a fuzzy awareness    of the muffled patter   of mittened paws.   … [click for more]

The Wonder by Pat Connors

The years which have led me into middle age unwittingly, unwillingly have yet been kind. I have lost 20 pounds I have gained strength, patience. My eyes may not work as well but I see much more clearly. What I used to hate I now love what I used to … [click for more]

“it didn’t happen here” by Eleonore Schönmaier

i‘m in the bus which is really just an old car  and it‘s night and pouring rain and i‘m thirteen and the car is jammed with bodies and we‘re about to head down the long dirt road out to my settlement and the driver shouts, don’t let the drunk indian in, shouts to close  the door and i slam the door shut and blood runs down the  window and a man is out there alone in the night with a … [click for more]

Interview with Eleonore Schönmaier

Eleonore Schönmaier’s poem “it didn’t happen here” was named the winner of the League’s 3rd annual National Broadsheet Contest, selected by judge D.A. Lockhart for its “strong images, and captivating lyric voice.” We spoke with Eleonore about her writing and reading practices and also her upcoming projects.   League of … [click for more]

2019 National Broadsheet Contest Winner: Eleonore Schönmaier

Congratulations to the winner of the League’s 3rd annual National Broadsheet Contest, Eleonore Schönmaier! Eleonore’s winning poem, “it didn’t happen here” was selected by our judge D.A. Lockhart for its “strong images, and captivating lyric voice.” Here’s a first look at “it didn’t happen here,” designed for a broadsheet by Briar Craig: … [click for more]

Snoot by Lindsay B-e

Professor, it’s been thirteen years since you told me not to make art projects about my pets, beasts that aren’t lofty enough, tufts of fur rolling like tumbleweeds. I’ve tried to be tame, a cold metallic distance between what I make and who I see, out of the corner of … [click for more]

The Runaway Housewife at One A.M. by Angeline Schellenberg

Leave your husband and son, travel west  over the tomato vomit in the hallway, toward  a ghost town—say Sanctuary, Saskatchewan,  with a possible overnight in Hyde. First, find  the door. Grab the last cinnamon bun:  to dull the razor blade of your tongue. Listen  a moment to the clink-clock of your hot buttons  tumbling in … [click for more]

Dinosaur Aloft by Marvyne Jenoff

(at the Royal Ontario Museum) How sleep loves bones: nightly she tends Tyrannosaurus, comforts through the thundering seasons of its life and in its death holds deep its darkening bones. Discovery, slow dynamite, brings into light those bones and Latin-names them, leaches them of data, resurrects them into this skeleton … [click for more]

let me be your june cleaver by Kerry Gilbert

let me be your june cleaver—black-and-white cheek bones crisp and bold. i will splash some brazen pink on the dining room table, with orchids i grew in the greenhouse. the children will be: well-fed with freshly grown organic beef-steaks; well-bathed in lavender oil; well-loved and happily reading joseph campbell at their homeschool desks. i will chill your martini, dry—straight up, … [click for more]

Baldspot by Murray Reiss

Because it is utterly open to heaven and all its blessings. Because when consciousness escapes my body at the moment of death no clinging tendrils will deflect its homeward flight. Because of the seven chakras it is the crown, the thousand-petalled rainbow-coloured lotus. Because Don Juan told Carlos Castaneda that … [click for more]

Left Coast Poetry Beat: Massy Books

Column by Bill Arnott Western Canada’s poetry scene teems with talent, from neophytes to award-laden laureates. Authors of every facet share spoken word, competitive slam, and rapier-sharp contemporary as writers and fans converge in person, print, online and on airwaves. This is not a list of writing/reading groups or events. … [click for more]