Pullovéria by Elana Wolff

Poet name: Elana Wolff Poem Name: Pullovéria Poem:	 There was too much writing,  most of it drivel. People slept through sentences—    driv’ling in their dreams.  Talk was blather also  though it had the slight advantage of providing  psychic hygiene—if only to the speaker.  No one took much notice of the blithering & scribbling,  except to blither drivel back.  Singing all but ceased  apart from jingle / jangle mixes. Music  reduced to mash.  And snow came down as rigmarole   		outside the shop that offers pullovers only:  		in seven sizes, twenty- seven shades.     There was too much writing,  most of it drivel. People slept through sentences—    driv’ling in their dreams.  Talk was blather also  though it had the slight advantage of providing  psychic hygiene—if only to the speaker.  No one took much notice of the blithering & scribbling,  except to blither drivel back.  Singing all but ceased  apart from jingle / jangle mixes. Music  reduced to mash.  And snow came down as rigmarole   		outside the shop that offers pullovers only:  		in seven sizes, twenty- seven shades.     End of Poem.  Credits: Copyright © Elana Wolff A slightly different version of “Pullovéria” was originally published in the Paris, France-based, English language journal, Upstairs at Duroc; Elana Wolff is the author of six collections of poetry and a collection of essays on poems. She has also co-authored, with the late Malca Litovitz, a collection of rengas; co-authored a chapbook of poems with Susie Petersiel Berg; co-edited with Julie Roorda a collection of poems written to poets and the stories that inspired them; and co-translated with Menachem Wolff poems from the Hebrew by Georg Mordechai Langer. Elana’s poems and creative nonfiction pieces have been published in Canada and internationally and have garnered awards. She has taught English for Academic Purposes at York University in Toronto and at The Hebrew University in Jerusalem. She currently divides her professional time between writing, literary editing, and designing and instructing social art courses. Her sixth collection, Swoon, is the 2020 winner of the Canadian Jewish Literary Award for Poetry.